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of the russian oil industry. i was just wondering if you could talk a little bit about the environment and environmental issues. here in this country whenever we talk about new exploration, we're also talking about environmental implications, and we hear about disasters here. we don't really hear much about them in russia, though i'm sure they exist and can be quite massive. so i wonder if you could just talk about that a bit. >> well, here we come to the guilty part of the guilty love. because i'm as conscious as everyone else that we are, in a sense, too clever for our own good. by the way, one of the unfortunate consequences of this bonanza that we are, that we have just, that we are now harvesting is that we are headed in all likelihood for an era of quite possibly cheaper hydrocarbons and certainly very abundant hydrocarbons. that thing which is so easy to us, which is to climb into our car and drive around to the nearest gas station is something that's going to get easier and easier and easier. for the next generation. and this is very bad news for the environment, there's no que
need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton and president barack obama sat down to dawk with "60 minutes tonight." he had plenty of nice things to say, but it wasn't so long ago they were like this. >> while i was working on the streets you were certificating on the board of walmart. >> you were representing resco in innercity chicago. >> my how things have changed. tonight on cbs they address the tragedy in benghazi, libya this past november. >> i knew chris stevens, i sent him there originally. it was a great personal loss to lose him and three other brave americans. i also have looked back and try to figure out what we can do so that nobody in so far as possible will be in this position again. we also live in a dangerous world. the people i'm proud to serve and work with in our diplomatic and development personnel ranks, they know it's a
developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about where we focus with reporting from the front lines. today on the two-year anniversary of the egyptian revolution that ousted hosni mubarak from power, the streets were filled not with peace but with violence. protesters for and against president mohamed morsi clashed with police, at least seven died. morsi did not address the country but tweeted on twitter. he called on people to uphold the noble principles of the revolution. >>> apple is no longer the world's biggest company. the title belongs to exxonmobil. apple shares plummeted on the heels of disappointing earnings resulted and plunged over 12%. apple's market cap first passed exxonmobil on august 9th, 2011. it's been sitting pretty 18 months, seemingly untouchable. tonight it is
and driven to succeed. we like that. melissa: and you should be comfortable in the environment. a very interesting stuff. thank you for coming on. >> absolutely. thank you for having me. melissa: next up, boeing is baffled by the ion battery. they may not be the root of the massive problems of the dream liner. could this have a bigger impact on the economy? have you notice stores in your area are charging you just to use your credit card? businesses in 40 states canal had customers with checkout fees. we will tell you why and what you can do and what to look for. piles of "money" coming up. ♪ stay top of mind with customers? from deals that bring them in with an offer... to social media promotions that turn fans into customers... to events that engage and create buzz... to e-mails that keep loyal customers coming back, our easy-to-use tools will keep you in front of your customers. see what's right for you at constantcontact.com/try. ♪ melissa: still no news from boeing on what exactly is causing all the problems that have grounded the entire fleet of streamliners. at first the lit
in the environment. a very interesting stuff. thank you for coming on. >> absolutely. thank you for having me. melissa: next up, boeing is baffled by the ion battery. they may not be the root of the massive problems of the dream liner. could this have a bigger impact on the economy? have you notice stores in your area are charging you just to use your credit card? businesses in 40 states canal had customers with checkout fees. we will tell you why and what you can do and what to look for. piles of "money" coming up. ♪ ♪ melissa: still no news from boeing on what exactly is causing all the problems that have grounded the entire fleet of streamliners. at first the lithium ion batteries were being break to the blame for starting fires. now experts are not so sure. the transport minister of japan says his safety inspector has not found anything, and now we're hearing reports that japan eased its safety standards ahead of the dream liner lunch in order to make it easier for japanese manufacturers to make parts for the plane peter is an aviation expert and former managing director of the ntsb.
about a great deal about the deteriorating threat environment in libya. you know, when i landed in tripoli, i was met by the zintan militia. that was the welcome i had. all these guys, dressed completely in black, holding their automatic weapons. that was my welcoming party. >> rubio told fox news last night, time will tell whether some of the things she said will bear out to be true or not. these things have a way of flushing themselves out. overall, clinton's political strengths were clearly on display. she was prepared, tough when she needed to be, deferential when she wanted to be, and she displayed both raw emotion and a sense of humor. it's also worth noting that she's stronger today, politically, than she was four years ago. consider, she's leaving office with the highest approval ratings of her political career, 67%, according to a "washington post"/abc poll. we had her at 69 in the nbc news/"wall street journal" poll. a whopping 91% of democrats approve of the job he's done, and that fervor was on vivid display, as senate and house democrats fell all over themselves enc
their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> we are back with tonight's "outer circle" where we reach out to sources around the world. we go to south africa where the search is on for thousands of crocodiles near the botswana border. rising floodwaters were threatening about 15,000 crocs on a breeding farm. the owners opened the farm's gates to relieve pressure. more than half the crocs or the loose. maybe that's good because they're not going to be turned into handbags. robyn curnow is following the story. >> reporter: fair to say the people who are trying to round up the crocs are doing it carefully. we understand the recapturing the mostly taking place at nighttime because crocodiles eyes grow red when lights reflected into them. in this largely farming rural area, residents are being warned not to try and capture the crocodiles by grabbing hold of their ta
has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> coming up, the republican doom and gloom vision of the obama economy just doesn't seem to match reality these days. i'll have the details coming up. >>> and while whistle-blowers come forward to describe the fraud that led to the financial collapse, the department of justice isn't going after wall street's ceos. i'll ask mike papantonio why they're just being let off the hook. you can listen to my radio show on sirius xm radio noon to 3:00 a.m. -- p.m. share your thoughts with us on #edshow. we're coming right back. uhh, it's next month, actually... eddie continues singing: to tickets to... paradiiiiiise! no four. remember? whoooa whooaa whooo! you know ronny, folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. and how happy are they jimmy? happier than eddie money running a tr
through. it was not a matter of their qualifications so much as the environment in which they were placed, which is not of their doing. their chain of command did not of of going through all of the level steps. they went to the wing commander. that is not something they did, that was something externally placed. that is my concern. the people in the periphery that want to see certain amounts, certain numbers of women in certain jobs, they may or may not be qualified. if they are not, they should not be in the job. i am concerned that somebody will say, they have to be in the job because our program, the inclusion of women demands it. then you start eroding or chipping away at the qualification issue. that, to be quite honest, is my biggest concern. not with the women can do. not what they are qualified to do. what people outside of the program thing should be done. host: i want to make sure i understand. when these women first came through as a pilot trainees, they had a different chain of command than their male trainee counterplots? caller: it was not anything written down on paper. if
of environment. we made the decision in the morning well after light. we conducted a strike on the house, and when it hit the target, we're literally watching, i'm sitting there -- my mom -- my stomach's in knots because it was really important to prove what we could do. and, of course, you're worried about collateral damage. civilians, what not. we got the explosion from the bomb, and there's two or three seconds of nothing, we're just sitting there going -- then suddenly secondaries go off, and they go off for about 20 minutes. it's extraordinary what we had hit in that place. that was almost the validation of what we were doing because eventually we learned we could use a combination of things, most notably the full motion video, but also a number of moving target indicators to develop pattern of life, follow people, vehicles and things, identify targets to hit. so increasingly our precision went up. when we went to a place, the percentage of time, you know, which we found and captured or killed our target was extraordinarily high. and it went up the whole war. in august of 2004, my f
the external environment has changed that the degree of danger is different now those effects may become dominant. and so yes, i can see a down side for doing thing that you believe are effective, legal and appropriate. if it denies you the cooperation of others who see it in a different way. and i think we're all aware of that. we knew that. hence in 2006, we huddled up. what's appropriate going forward with no judgment whatsoever on what went on before? different circumstances. different people. >> not having read the c.i. report, i would say that before it's released, it needs to be fixed. if, in fact, it concludes that the enhanced interrogation program had no value, they need to take a second look and maybe even spend more time and talk to those of us who that were involved in the program way back when. i spent a lot of time talking to people who work with me. so my deputies were very senior analysts, very logical and these are folks that will analyze even aspect of things. and he gave me a 15-republican explanation as to why he thought it was ethical and why he agreed to participat
in los angeles. you could find yourself in a lawless environment in this country. the store was about a place called koreatown. there are marauding gangs going through the area burning stores, looting and robbing. the vice-president said in response to me, he said, no, you would be better off with a 12 gauge shotgun. that is his opinion, and i respect it. i have an ar-15 at home and i have not heard anybody and i do not intend to, but i would be better off protecting my family if there was law-and-order breakdown in my neighborhood. i do not think that makes me and on reasonable person. mr. trotter when you say you speak on behalf of millions of women out there who believe an ar-15 makes them safer, there were a lot of giggles and the room, and that explains the dilemma. the people who were giggling were saying to you, that is crazy. nobody i know thinks that way. which reminds me of the harvard professor who said i cannot believe mcgovern lost. everyone i knew voted for him. i bet there are people on our side that cannot believe obama won because everyone they know voted against him.
and environment. this is one of the most biodiverse countries in the world. we're literally scorching the lungs of the earth. but colombia is bigger than texas and california combined. the same is true of bolivia, the same is true of peru. these are very large land masses, and trying to eradicate coca is like trying to have a war on canned lions in the united states. you know, good luck, it's not possible. nonetheless,ing our drug warriors did this in colombia. so after 12 years of merciless onslaught of eradication, 12 years ago 90% of cocaine in the united states originated from colombia. after a dozen years of intense drug war in colombia, today about 95% of u.s. cocaine originates from colombia. whereas less than 1% originates from bolivia. and the bolivians actually have done much better in terms of eradication of excess coca and interdiction of cocaine, some of its transiting through peru to brazil and argentina, other countries. but also their own illicit cocaine, they've captured and ask seized more of that than previous governments that were very subserve crept to u.s. governments. so
and now i'm in a very good environment and there are a lot of things to be done and that i'd like to do so i have to be very engaged. it's a very, very full of things to do and i'm very happy about that. >> suarez: are you able to keep up with events in china as closely as you were when you were doing your human rights work there? >> (translated): there are many ways to get -- to become informed. in a sense, it's easier to be informed here than when i was in china. i'm not saying that in china things cannot be done. what i'm saying is that things can be done from many different angles to promote what we need to promote. >> suarez: well, since you left the country there have been continued arrests of dissidents, suppression of press freedoms with the southern weekly, attempts to control access to the internet. a lot of things are moving along in china. what does it tell you about the government's attitude toward free speech and free thought? >> (translated): i think this only goes to show that the chinese government and the party still wants to control everything and if they keep holding an
think about job creation, energy independence, protecting the environment, all of that is done with this route. so to me, he is at a stage where he could approve it and should approve it. again, i don't mind him taking 60 days to review it. i understand that but let's don't, we shouldn't have this go on the entire year. it is really now time for the president to act. bill: it's a lot of jobs and goes right to the heart of our energy policy as you would argue. the left considers this product dirty oil. what do you say to that? >> i say to that, look at the big picture. this is about energy independence. you know what? i've talked to young men and women who are over defending our country in the middle east because of oil. i don't want them over there for those reasons. if we reduce our dependence on middle eastern oil we'll be a lot safer in our country, economically, national kurtwise. we can move this oil relatively safely. that doesn't mean there won't be a spill. it could be localized. you can never say there won't be any spills but the report suggests it would be minimal in
. certainly they were. but he was in a crisis environment from the moment he stepped in. his approach was to enact the biggest tax increase in the country and the biggest in connecticut history. at the same time he was doing that he was making budget cuts. there was a real flight with public employee unions in canada as a kid. -- a real fight with public employee unions in connecticut. he really had some hard choices to make over the last couple of years. connecticut stands out. host: here is a recent story from "usa today," -- let us talk about the mandates states have to balance their budgets. here is from. how significant is that? guest: the wasted governments -- it is very significant. state governments could not say that we would put these bills on. they have ways around balanced budget requirement. there are ways to make the budget look balanced on paper without being really balance. they cannot act in a countercyclical way, spend money when things did bad. they tend to cut money when things did that in the economy. then it drags itself on the economy. that is why you have the f
in the affordable care at. .. unfortunately that is the environment that we are living in. it was a very interesting panel especially the last one. there is nothing better than congressional staffers actually hear from people who practice medicine. you know, patients are going through their treatments. one of the things that the reality that we suffer with, unfortunately, and this is something we all have to deal with, it is just a physical reality. as he rightly pointed out, it is right now the debate about budget and people are trying to figure how to control costs and figure out savings that are scored by studios. the cbo gets a lot of bad rap from people. but i am a fan. they have a very tough job to do. they always come out and it's a very tough job that they have to do and it's hard to please everyone in a town like washington dc and they try to be the best that can. i afford a lot of respect to them. at the end of the day, that is the reality that we have to operate under. so we get a lot of ideas from utah, we have the great health care system, which is a lot of integrated health care delive
with republicans about spending cuts, um, in a very bad environment with consumer demand going downward. that is not an environment for him to score wins with. jon: and 7.8% unemployment and his jobs council is going away, but the president has four more years. we'll continue to watch it. a.b. stoddard from "the hill," thank you. >> thank you. jenna: well, a frightening standoff right now in alabama where a 5-year-old boy is being held hostage in a bizarre underground bunker by a suspected killer. former nypd hostage negotiator on the delicate task that is really facing police right now. what do you do in this situation? we'll talk about it with an expert coming up. plus, seeing is believing, where a massive twister tore through a town smashing homes and killing at least one perp. rick reichmuth on where this violent storm is moving now. >> get over here. ♪ you know my heart burns for you... ♪ i'm up next, but now i'm sging the heartburn blues. hold on, prilosec isn't for fast relief. cue up alka-seltzer. it stops heartburn fast. ♪ oh what a relief it is! cue up alka-seltzer. it s
certainly aware of the increasing threat environment. i not only was briefed on that, i testified to that effect. and there were constant evaluations going on. but no one, not the ambassador, security professionals, the intelligence community ever recommended closing that mission. and the reason they didn't was because the ongoing threat environment had up until the spring before our terrible attack in benghazi been a result of post-conflict conditions. that is something that we're familiar with all over the world. yes, there were some attacks, as you have said, but our evaluation of them and the recommendation by the security professionals was that those were all manageable because we had a lot of that around the world. i mean, there is a long list of attacks that have been foiled, assassination plots that have been prevented. so this is not some -- you know, one off event. this is considered in an atmosphere of a lot of threats and dangers. and at the end of the day, you know, there was a decision made that this would be evaluated but it would not be closed and, unfortunately, w
are but a manifestation of the brilliance of nature to enable us to adapt to the environment in which we evolved, that somehow these characteristics determine our innate worth and value as human beings. that is the essence of racism. but that system was not cultivated into every intellectual commercial, judicial, religious philosophical medical system that we have. the imbalances you see in the country today -- i call them inequities' -- are but reflections of that deep-seated belief. is it conscious in most of us? no. in some of us, yes. i understand the ku klux klan was going to have a rally. some people consciously adhere to that belief. but most of us have been swept up in it and we do not even know it. it is easy to be at the top and never have to think about it. it is impossible to be on the bottom and not think about that on a daily basis and not internalize the absurdity of the devaluation of your humanity on a daily basis. my lovely daughter once said to me, "how did the story of african-americans get inverted into a story of victimization only? how is that story and not a story of triu
environment the united states is facing? what we have better discussions during these debates that centered more on the economy? >> i think in the end, this one did come down to the economy. the president may be basing his second term on social issues. if you take his inauguration speech as a guidepost to where he wants to go from here. but i did not hear him to talk a lot about the campaign -- during the campaign. the economy began to get better. i did not see him spending a lot of time talking about gay rights during the election. i did not hear him talk very much about gun control. i think it was mentioned once in one of the debates. i think they thought they had to get -- what they concentrated on, in some ways, this was not so much an election about issues as it was about identifying their voters and getting their voters to the polls and recognizing the demographics in this country were changing dramatically. they figured that out and how to get people to the polls and republicans did not do as well. i think the core of the president's message was the economy. >> the last question beca
. >> it is a stressful environment. we are trying to keep them as comfortable. >> reporter: outside pittsburgh when a water main broke single digit temperature turned gushing water into a sheet of ice. skimming across the ice at speeds of up to 60 miles per hour in what looks like a mini kayak with a sail. for those who have to work outside -- >> as long as i bundle up i am good. >> reporter: maybe the best way to get by is thinking hot. >> key largo is a great place this time of year. >> how are you doing out there? 19 degrees i understand in new york? >> reporter: that's right with a wind chill of about 8. they have set up warming centers here in new york city because it is very serious, this cold for those who are vulnerable, the very young and very old. if you are hearty enough to come out you have a lot of people out here taking photographs of the fountain here in bryant park where -- because they think it looks cool to get this effect, they have heaters which keep the pipes warm and allow them to keep it flowing. you see the effect. nice icicles. you have to make sure to put the layers on if
business. but today, that field has changed in our competitors are vying to more supportive environment for innovators, conventions and started companies. there's been a change in the field of opportunity back home for those foreign nationals who in increasing numbers are educated in the united states and whom we've been forced to return to the nation of origin. even though many of the most talented young people around the globe still point to the united states to obtain their masters or doctoral degrees in spam, now more than ever they are not just tempted to take their education home with them and start businesses elsewhere. they attracted a home countries and force my outdated immigration system. what an unwise way to compete in the global economy. our outdated immigration system has been adapted for modern world. half of all masters and doctoral degrees at american universities are earned by foreign-born students who then face an uncertain, expensive and i will be passed to pursuing their dreams in the united states. our country is hemorrhaging innovation in the inventors to make th
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clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-414-5999 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. >>> breaking news here. this just out of phoenix. this is video from our affiliate ktvk. police responding to reports of a shooting. multiple victims at a business complex. we are told this is near 16th street and glendale avenue. this is in phoenix. the business complex. now the sus is expect, we are learning, reportedly fled from the scene. there is a search that is now under way. we are looking at aerial shots as well. we understand that there are police cars on the scene. there are ambulances and fire engines as well that responded to the report of the shooting. we also saw -- there you go. now we have the aerials there. somebody was rolled out on a stretcher earlier. this is certainly a situation that is now unfolding. it is
, for the environment and kwaul of life frankly. this is the central transit system for the region. if you are going to see who is going to carry the ball, i'm skeptical unless people step up in ways they haven't before. the politicians in virginia and maryland right now, they can't even decide on how to find enough money to keep their own road systems from going bankrupt. if they can't figure that out and struggling with that right now how are they going to come up with lots more money for transit? if you look at the business community, some people in the business community like the greater washington board of trade, they are all in for metro. they are the leading supporters for metro. the business community is fragmented and there are lots of parts of the business community that have sort of view. out the dulles corridor in northern virginia and the medical companies and technology companies up 270 in montgomery county and north of there. they are not necessarily as tied in or focused on what's best for the region. and the metro general manager says you've got to have the business community all in
create a new environment here in the senate where we will let the minority have their amendments but also the minority party will also let the process move forward. and i think that's the tradeoff that was the fundamental aspect of the negotiations that we continued in the senator from michigan's office for many, many days and many hours. if someone wants to block -- i think the senator from michigan and the senator from maryland would agree. if someone wants to block the senator from moving forward, they can at least do it for some period of time. and what's happened here, look back 10, 15 years ago, the tree wasn't filled up. but at the same time, on the other side, amendments were wa t produced by the hundreds. there was -- there's got to b be -- i believe that the object and i believe the outcome of this hard-earned compromise will be that there will be a greater degree of comity in the senate which would allow us to achieve the legislative goals that all of us seek. mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that -- that the senator from michigan join the senator from maryland and me in
part of my state are still not living in a security environment. we owe them that. at the same time, i think more and more americans are agreeing these 11 million people need to come out of the shadows and we need to give them a path to citizenship but not favoritism. >> senator mccain, you're exactly right. the polls are showing the majority of americans do support the type of proposal you and chuck schumer are putting forward. what would you say to conservative house republicans that will call anything you try to pat in t-- pass in the senat amnesty. >> i think we will and already are reaching across to our friendson the otherside talking and i think they realize the realities of the 21st century and there will be some difficulties and it's long hard path. i'm confident we will succeed. >> senator shuman, willie geist in new york, good to see you this morning. there's a piece in the "new york times" where a reporter goes to a diner in south carolina. the concern down there is people are being rewarded for illegal behavior, a, and b, being given priority over workers in america who ca
on principles but also have civility and i think we can do a little bit to improve the environment. host: sasha on twitter is advocating for more specifics when you talk about earmarks for your district. is it hard as an incoming freshman to take the lumps of what it means to cut spending for your constituents? guest: cutting my own budget by 10% is a significant reduction, and beyond that we have reached a point as a nation where there will be no sacred cows. the pledge we made as a house republican team is that our budget will balance in 10 years and now paul ryan budget of just last year had a lot of praise, and rightfully so because it was the only show in town, but it balance in about 20 years. that is a remarkable difference. you will see means testing of social security and medicare, probably benefit reductions that would apply to folks closer to 60 in age and a specific plan of proposals that we will roll out in the budget committee over the next couple of months. listen, we are not quick -- kidding. we have to stop spending meet -- money we do not have as a nation. host: commerce and l
of the political parties. i worry about the environment and all kinds of things, but the reality -- reliability of the u.s. debt, not at all. i am worried about the social and political stability of the world. a large part of europe that is depressioneriencing great levels of unemployment. and how long can we sustain u stable democratic system when 60 percent of the young people are out of work? that is the concern in europe right now. host: the twitter question touches on this. also, are there any models in europe that are succeeding? guest: if you look at sweden has handled this very well. the excess of welfare state is the problem. the biggest welfare state in the world and has driven through the crisis beautifully. my favorite, the little economy that could, iceland. they were supposed to turn into a smoking whole, but they broke their rules. they did not bail out the bankers. they were willing to let the currency to value. they were willing to let there be controls. it has a lower and a plumber rate than we do right now. -- unemployment rate than we do right now. britain is interesting. wh
bienenfeld senior manager environment and energy strategy product regulatory office, american honda motor company incorporated. reg modlin director of regulatory affairs chrysler llc. tom stricker vice president predatory affairs in energy and environmental research, toyota motors north america incorporated and amy, if you would like to get started we will try to get the audience to quiet down. >> thank you for that great introduction. we have two out of three of our panelists so i guess that is the two-thirds majority so we will go ahead and get started. i think that was a great discussion with gina mccarthy and mary nichols and the other experts on that panel. i want to take the big picture and talk about the two sets of regulations that the obama administration proposes and finalized in the last four years. it was certainly a busy first term and now the next four years is really where the bumper hits the road. i would like to ask each of you to talk about what challenges and opportunities he sees and the -- up until at least 2025 about how your companies are going to simultaneously mee
? it is a fantastic place to be. i'm at the intersection of public policy and advanced technology for environment and safety. if it is a fantastic deal to be in now. it is the wave of the future. advanced vehicles, and advanced technologies. we work with the government on regulatory issues, collect a lot of information on the future of energy, where it's headed in the u.s. and globally. and we tried to use the information to help steer toyota's advanced development. guest: one of the high points is greenhouse gases and fuel economy for our vehicles. the auto industry has signed up for some fairly aggressive standards that will take us to the 2025 model year. they are aggressive standards. consumers will have to embrace the technologies we're trying to get out there. host: what does that really mean? guest: the target is 54 miles per hour by 2025. we have a lot of work to do. our strategy is are hybrid strategy. toyota had 16% of our new vehicle fleet were hybrid vehicles. the industry itself is that 3%. we intend to maintain that leadership. host: that means you have to do with the future of what
's important to them to be able to create a safe environment for this gentlemen to be able to tell his story. they know heights a complicated story and they know it will take time. they want to earn his trust and let him know that they are his voice to the outside world. martha: very interesting. and we know that he's in a bunker. he has been sort of fortifying and planning this place for quite some time. the neighbors were aware that he was building this underground there, you know, but you need to obviously appeal to his sense of this child, and that this child has nothing to do with whatever it is that is bothering him, right? >> well, yeah, i mean he feels -- for whatever reason he feels attacked, he feels very defensive about what is going on around him. everything that he's done is clearly to protect himself. the child is not a threat to him, and for whatever reason it was that he took this child it's part of his mechanism to try and protect himself. so he shouldn't see this child as a threat, and he's probably -- the negotiators can actually help him understand how to control the situ
's a very hostile environment. so the republican party is concerned, i think talk radio is concerned. i think independent and conservative outlets are concerned. they're saying, well, how far will this white house go to wipe the debate in a way that is not productive? >> brian: do you believe, in your estimation, that the white house might have more aggressive view than even democrats in the senate and the house? >> i don't know who captured whom. i don't know who the democratic party's back the kidnap victim of. i don't know if the white house has become so progressive that it's taken over the democratic party or the democratic party has taken over the white house. i do know when john boehner says we're looking at annihilation and destruction, but we have something that's really interesting. people have to think about it today. the white house has now set up another arm, a so-called not for profit arm. so now we have branches of government raising hundreds of millions of dollars to perpetuate their viewpoint. should the supreme court do it next? should the house of representatives do i
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